Pheasant Breast Recipe with Crispy Heart, Celeriac, Cavolo Nero, Shiitake Mushrooms, Hazelnut Puree, Candied Hazelnuts, Parsnip Crisps, Pickled Blackberries & Hazelnut Jus

This pheasant breast recipe pairs both the breast and heart of the pheasant with everything from parsnip crisps to candied hazelnuts and makes it taste incredible!

Ed Chef - Skip to recipe

Subscribe Now

Subscribe to my newsletter now for a free guide to cooking curries! AND I’ll send you weekly tricks, tips and updates that will help you elevate your cooking to the next level!


Candied Hazelnuts, Cavolo Nero, Celeriac, Hazelnut Jus, Hazelnut Puree, Herb Crusted Pheasant Heart, Parsnip Crisps, Pheasant Breast Recipe, Pickled Blackberries, Shiitake Mushrooms

Introduction

One of the wonderful things about living in the South of England is the availability of a whole host of ingredients that are far more exotic than those found in any supermarket. As an avid explorer of cuisines from all over the globe, it is a particular shame that I at times take so many of those ingredients for granted.

Living, as I do, just a few short miles from Dartmoor, I am entirely surrounded by countryside. Huge expanses of boggy moorland and the sodden, overgrown woodland that surround it house all manner of distinct and fascinating wildlife.

Advertisements

If you dig deep through the moss and twigs you’ll find all kinds of edible and inedible fungi. Though I wouldn’t advise trying it out for yourself without the trusted eyes of a verified expert.

And if you stalk your way cautiously through the undergrowth, you might just lay your eyes upon one of the many delicious creatures that inhabit this part of the world. Only to quickly find they’ve usually seen you long before you see them.

Candied Hazelnuts, Cavolo Nero, Celeriac, Hazelnut Jus, Hazelnut Puree, Herb Crusted Pheasant Heart, Parsnip Crisps, Pheasant Breast Recipe, Pickled Blackberries, Shiitake Mushrooms

It is to this surprisingly exotic ecosystem that I owe so much of the food that comes my way. I cannot take the credit for hunting or foraging, but I am far from squeamish and don’t mind getting my hands dirty.

Another of the wonderful things about living where I do, is the kindness of those who surround me. When my friends are successful in their forays into the countryside, they tend to be very generous.

In turn, I do the best I can to provide them with something in return. Sometimes a simple pie or even something a little more complicated, like this pheasant breast recipe right here.

About the dish

First and foremost, I’m going to assume your bird has already been prepared. This is more of a how to cook pheasant dish than an outright what to do with pheasant kind of deal.

Advertisements

Unfortunately, while I am very sure of how to cook pheasant, I am only a competent butcher. Enough that I am able to salvage everything from bone to offal, but not enough that I am able to do so in any kind of guide-friendly manner.

So, where to begin? This pheasant breast recipe is my tribute to the flavours of the woodland. We have the earthiness of mushroom and celeriac, alongside the freshness of the pickled blackberries and the cavolo nero.

Candied Hazelnuts, Cavolo Nero, Celeriac, Hazelnut Jus, Hazelnut Puree, Herb Crusted Pheasant Heart, Parsnip Crisps, Pheasant Breast Recipe, Pickled Blackberries, Shiitake Mushrooms

The parsnip and herb crust bring crispness as well as flavour, and the candied hazelnuts bring a wonderful caramelised crunch. And just in case that hazelnut flavour was at risk of getting lost in the mix, we’ll be cramming it into the sauce and the puree as well.

We will simply fry the pheasant breast, allowing it to shine. But we will also try to make use of the rest of the bird. For today, that simply means using the hearts, unless you’d also like to make your own stock. But we will be using the legs and more in another recipe in just a couple of days.

The wonderful thing about pheasant breast is that it doesn’t have quite so potently gamey a flavour as some birds, so this recipe is a little more versatile than most. The other flavours are there to support the subtly gamey flavours, rather than to be overwhelmed.

The whole dish should work quite harmoniously. But pay particular attention to the pickled blackberries and both the candied hazelnuts and the hazelnut puree. They bring a sweetness and tartness that help to balance out an otherwise extremely rich dish.

A few final things to remember

  • I haven’t included a stock recipe below because I imagine anyone prepping their own bird will know the process, but I will quickly run through it here just in case. Roast off the bones until they’re cooked and browned, then submerge them in water in a large pan with a few simple aromats like onion, garlic, celery and peppercorns. Reduce that all the way down until you have your stock and then your sauce!
  • You could actually use any kind of game you like. Even duck. In fact, you could probably even get away with chicken in this recipe, although it might not be quite so exciting.
  • Further to the above, even venison would work wonderfully here. But it would quite dramatically change the nature of the dish.
  • The candied hazelnuts are one of my favourite things here. I challenge anyone not to snack on them as they cook.
  • The pickled blackberries also deserve a suitable amount of love. Balancing the sugar, vinegar and water spells the difference between delicious and terrible!
  • The mushrooms really do require barely any cooking at all. A minute or two in an already hot pan should suffice. I don’t even recommend seasoning them necessarily, as they’ll be going into a pan that’s already bursting with flavour.
  • Oh, and the pheasant hearts are totally optional. They were a nice little touch I recall seeing at a restaurant I used to work at. If you can’t get hold of them or if you’re not big on offal, don’t worry, everything they provide can be found elsewhere in the dish.

Similar Recipes & Useful Sides

Lamb Chops with Asparagus & Goat’s Cheese The first and still the most visually beautiful recipe I’ve ever posted. And not my usual style either.

Sweet & Sour Duck Breast – If pheasant’s your thing, duck can’t be far behind. In this dish, we combine modern presentation with Chinese-influenced flavours.

Pork Sirloin with Creamy Polenta Mash – Big ingredients, cooked with a lot of love and care.

Spiced Lamb Rump with Carrot, Ginger, Cauliflower & Pearl Barley – The sexiest, creamiest, butteriest, chickeniest curry I’ve ever made and an absolute personal favourite.



Subscribe Now

Subscribe to my newsletter now for a free guide to cooking curries! AND I’ll send you weekly tricks, tips and updates that will help you elevate your cooking to the next level!


PHEASANT BREAST RECIPE WITH CELERIAC, SHIITAKE, HAZELNUT, PARSNIP & BLACKBERRIES

Pheasant Breast Recipe with Celeriac Shiitake, Hazelnut, Parsnip & Blackberries

Ed Chef
Pheasant Breast Recipe with Crispy Heart, Celeriac, Cavolo Nero, Shiitake Mushrooms, Hazelnut Puree, Candied Hazelnuts, Parsnip Crisps, Pickled Blackberries & Hazelnut Jus
Servings 2

Ingredients
  

  • 2 Pheasant Breasts
  • 2 Pheasant Hearts optional
  • 2 tbsp Plain Flour
  • 1 Egg
  • 1/2 cup Breadcrumbs
  • 200 g Hazelnuts
  • 1 sml Celeriac
  • 150 g Shiitake Mushrooms
  • 1 pack Thyme
  • 4 cloves Garlic
  • Cavolo Nero
  • 1 Parsnip
  • 10 Blackberries
  • Cider Vinegar
  • Lemon Juice
  • Caster Sugar
  • 600 ml Stock chicken, game or lamb
  • Butter lots
  • Salt
  • Ground Black Pepper

Instructions
 

  • Finely chop and roast 50g hazelnuts with 1 tbsp caster sugar and a good pinch of salt at 200c until they colour and caramelise, then set aside. I estimate around 15 minutes, but I have not timed it yet, so just keep an eye on it.
  • Set aside 200ml stock for the celeriac and reduce it down with the hazelnuts until you have roughly enough for two. When you’re ready to serve, finish the sauce with roughly 1 tbsp butter, added off the heat and swirled in to finish.
  • Remove the hazelnuts from the sauce and set them aside for a moment. Peel your celeriac and cut your fondants. Mine were about 5 – 6 cm wide and 1.5 – 2 thick. Chop up what’s left and place it into a small pan with just enough water to comfortably submerge. If the hazelnuts you removed from the sauce earlier are not yet as soft as you might want, place them in as well. Simmer until the celeriac is soft, then strain off the water and add the celeriac and the hazelnuts to a blender with some salt, sugar and a generous amount of butter. Blend everything until smooth and set aside to be reheated later, either in a small pan or a microwave.
  • Soften 2 tbsp butter and combine with 1/2 tsp black pepper, 1/2 cup breadcrumbs and some thyme leaves, but not the stalks. 1 – 2 tsp. Season with salt.
  • Fry the celeriac fondants in an ovenproof pan with a lid on a medium temperature with oil, butter, salt, garlic and a little thyme, turning when coloured to do the same to the other side. Leave them to cool, then top each one with a thin layer of the crumb you made above, then bake until soft, roughly 10 – 15 minutes. If the breadcrumbs still aren’t suitably coloured, finish under the grill/broiler for just a couple of minutes.
  • Clean up the pheasant hearts and roll them in flour, then crack your egg, give it a whisk and coat them in that as well. Next, roll them in the bread mix you made above and deep fry them for just 2 – 3 minutes, until brown and cooked through. Season further if required and either serve if ready or set aside to reheat when it's time.
  • Make a pickling liquid from a good glug of cider vinegar, a splash of lemon juice, a little water, a good hit of caster sugar, as in 2 – 3 tbsp, and 1/2 – 1 tsp mustard seeds. A little salt wouldn’t go amiss either, but don’t go overboard. Heat it enough to disolve the sugar and taste check it. If suitably balanced, add the blackberries and simmer for just a couple of minutes, then drain and set them aside until ready to use.
  • Peel the parsnip and trim the ends, then use a peeler or a mandolin (or some very, very finessed knife cuts) to make a whole load of thin slivers of parsnip. Deep fry them at 180c until brown and crisp, then season and set aside until ready to serve.
  • Trim any thicker stalks from the cavolo nero and simmer 4 – 6 leaves for about 5 minutes in salted water.
  • At the same time, season and brown the pheasant on both sides in an oiled pan on medium high heat. Cook for just a couple of minutes per side. During the last minute or so, throw a little butter, some garlic and thyme into the pan and as it melts, baste the pheasant all over. Finish the pheasant for just a few minutes in the oven while you bring anything you need to back to temperature.
  • Trim any particularly thick mushroom stalks and then cook them in the same oiled, buttered pan you cooked the meat in, removing any stalky pieces of thyme or large or burnt pieces of garlic or garlic peel. Season if required and serve once the mushroom is cooked, which should only take a couple of minutes.
Keyword Candied Hazelnuts, Cavolo Nero, Celeriac, Hazelnut Jus, Hazelnut Puree, Herb Crusted Pheasant Heart, Parsnip Crisps, Pheasant Breast Recipe, Pickled Blackberries, Shiitake Mushrooms

If you’ve enjoyed this recipe or have any comments or queries, please do let us know in the comments section below! And don’t forget to like and share!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Recipe Rating