A beautiful top-down photo of the wholemeal flour bread.

Wholemeal Flour Bread Recipe | Baking with Wholemeal Flour

Wholemeal Flour Bread Recipe | Baking with Wholemeal Flour

This wholemeal flour bread recipe will teach you everything you need to know about baking with wholemeal flour! I’ve been doing a lot of baking recently, so you might also want to check out my simple white bread recipe or even these beautiful brioche buns!


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A gorgeous overhead photo of the wholemeal flour bread.
A gorgeous overhead photo of the wholemeal flour bread.

Introduction

Baking is quickly becoming one of my favourite pastimes. It’s always been a distant second to cooking. Probably because cooking is a necessary part of day-to-day life. We need it to survive. Even if we don’t knead it to survive! But now, for the first time, I find myself baking almost as often as a cook!

Baking involves a very different set of processes to cooking. Kneading dough, for example, is actually quite straightforward, but it’s intimidating to begin with. Allowing it to rise requires a certain sense of judgement that can only really be learned through practise. Nevertheless, in this guide, I will try to break down those steps as best I can!

But it’s so worth it! Bread is delicious. Revolutionary, even! And there’s a lot of satisfaction to be found in making your own.

You’ll find a few bread recipes here on the site. Some are a little more run of the mill than others. Excuse the mill pun! This wholemeal flour bread is a pretty damned straightforward loaf of bread, but it isn’t necessarily something you would make all the time. So, next time you’re looking for a great bread recipe, you might want to check out the breads and pastries here on the site. I would very much recommend this delicious caraway bread recipe if you’re looking for somewhere to start!

A gorgeous overhead photo of the wholemeal flour bread.

About wholemeal flour bread

It’s a well known stereotype that children prefer white bread to brown. I don’t know how much truth there is in that. I got used to brown bread at a very young age. What I do know is that as we grow up, flavour and texture become more important parts of our palate.

A little bit of bite and density can go a long way. They make things far more interesting. That, to me, is the wonderful thing about wholemeal flour bread. It just has so much taste and a wonderful, soft yet chewy consistency. It’s beautiful.

You could use this kind of bread for anything at all. It would be perfect for a light sandwich, like my gorgeous BLT or in this delicious grilled chicken salad sandwich. Alternatively, you could use it to dip into soups or stews or anything else saucy and delicious!

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About this wholemeal flour bread recipe

This is a really simple, straightforward recipe. You could apply this to any kind of bread. If you had regular strong flour, for example, you’d do just fine to make a white loaf by following these instructions.

That’s why it’s such a useful recipe to follow. If at first you stick to a simple 5:3 ration of flour to water and learn a little about the proving times and temperatures, everything becomes much, much easier! From there, you can experiment with adapting and adjusting your recipes.

We’re only going to garnish this loaf of bread with a little bit of flour. But you could use poppy seeds, sesame seeds or anything else you have available. As I did in my caraway loaf, you could flavour the bread with spices or even herbs.

And that is perhaps the handiest thing about learning the basics of bread making first of all. When you’re working from a fairly blank canvas like this one, you can move onto experimenting with anything you like!

Before and after - Baking with wholemeal flour!
Before and after – Baking with wholemeal flour!

Things to remember!

  • Make sure you knead the dough until you feel it become more elastic. It will start to spring back to shape once it’s ready to go.
  • The amount of water is a guide, but if you want to increase the amount and feel cofortable doing so, that will result in a lighter, fluffier loaf. The trade off, of course, is that it becomes more difficult to work with.
  • When you prove the dough, do so until it doubles in size. That’s a common statement in bread recipes and when I first started I remember finding it quite confusing. Doubled in size is easy to say, but it doesn’t necessarily mean a lot to the naked eye. If you take a look at the picture above, you’ll see how far the dough can go. In fact, it could actually rise even further and still be perfectly usable. But I got impatient!
  • Don’t get impatient!
  • In the recipe, I will describe the process of shaping the dough, prior to the second prove. What I’m referring to can be seen below. If you imagine loosely gripping the dough all the way around near the bottom and gently lifting your hand, tightening the dough as you go, then almost tucking it in on itself. That’s the general gist of the process.
When you shape the dough, you'll form a crease a little like this one. You want to keep on rounding the dough as if you're tucking the sides tighter and tighter into that crease.
When you shape the dough, you’ll form a crease a little like this one. You want to keep on rounding the dough as if you’re tucking the sides tighter and tighter into that crease. Forgive the blurry photo!

Similar Recipes

Simple Homemade White Bread Recipe

Soft & Fluffy Caraway Seed Loaf



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A beautiful top-down photo of the wholemeal flour bread.

Wholemeal Flour Bread Recipe | Baking with Wholemeal Flour

This wholemeal flour bread recipe will teach you everything you need to know about baking with wholemeal flour!
Prep Time 2 hrs 30 mins
Cook Time 30 mins

Equipment

  • 2 x 22-25cm Non-Stick Cake Moulds (or equivalent)

Ingredients
  

  • 500 g Wholemeal Flour
  • 300 ml Water
  • 1 dessertspoon Salt
  • 1 dessertspoon Caster Sugar
  • 7 g Dried Active Yeast

Instructions
 

  • Add 7g yeast and 1 dessertspoonful of caster sugar to 300ml warm water.
  • Leave the water to sit for a few minutes in a warm place. The mixture should begin to bubble and rise up.
  • Pour 500g wholemeal flour into a mixing bowl.
  • Add a dessertspoonful of salt and then the yeast, sugar and water mixture.
  • Combine everything and knead the dough on a flat surface for 5 – 10 minutes. You’ll start to notice the elasticity in the dough develop and it will become springy as you work it.
  • Clean out the mixing bowl and place the dough back in. Cover it with a wet cloth and let the dough prove in a warm place for about an hour, or until the dough has doubled in size.
  • Remove the dough and shape it into a tight ball. Keep on shaping for a minute or two even once the dough is the desired shape.
  • When ready, put the dough into a 22cm cake mould, crease side up. We’re effectively creating a dutch oven, so a real one would be a perfectly good alternative!
  • Dust the top of the bread with flour.
  • Place the other on top and allow the dough to prove again. I would advise at least 45 minutes in this instance.
  • Pre-heat an oven to 180c.
  • Bake the bread for 20 minutes at 180, then increase the temperature to 240c and bake for a further 10.
  • Remove the bread from the oven and allow to cool.

If you’ve enjoyed this recipe or have any comments or queries, please do let us know in the comments section below! And don’t forget to like and share!

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