Salted dark chocolate caramels.

Homemade Salted Dark Chocolate Caramels Recipe

Homemade Salted Dark Chocolate Caramels Recipe

This homemade salted dark chocolate caramels recipe will show you how to make caramel, how to temper chocolate and how to mould the chocolates! For a milkier, fudgier alternative, try my wonderful fudge chocolates.

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Introduction

If there’s one thing I never thought I would be doing, it’s making home made chocolates. I still very much think of making chocolates and sweets as very different to cooking. It’s only in recent times that I’ve made my first real foray into the world of desserts and I have done so with only partial success. So diving headfirst into an even more abstract set of techniques wasn’t something I ever expected to do.

Nevertheless, here I am. I enjoy learning and this is a great set of skills to learn. People don’t tend to make chocolate at home very often, so it’s a great thing to be able to show off!

It’s also surprisingly easy, although I don’t always admit it. The difficulty lies in the patience it takes to make the caramel and to temper the chocolate. And sometimes in removing the chocolates from the mould, but you can solve that with a little stubbornness!

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About the recipe

Before anyone begins, you will need a thermometer and a mould of some kind for the chocolates. Rubber moulds will do, but I have a small selection of polycarbonate moulds that are absolutely perfect and only cost me a few pounds a time.

There is a more traditional way of tempering chocolate. When you make it that way, you cool the chocolate to 27c before bringing it back up to 31c. Don’t worry. We’re not missing a step. I won’t pretend to understand the science properly, but when we add more chocolate to cool it down, we skip that step.

Finally, take your time. When you cool the chocolate in the moulds, make sure it’s set before you try to add any filling. When you’ve added the filling, make sure you cool it all the way back down before you seal the chocolates. If that means you have to temper the chocolate again, it isn’t the end of the world! Although, you know, hopefully you won’t have to!



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Subscribe to my newsletter now for a free guide to cooking curries! AND I’ll send you weekly tricks, tips and updates that will help you elevate your cooking to the next level!


Salted dark chocolate caramels.

Homemade Salted Dark Chocolate Caramels Recipe

This homemade salted dark chocolate caramels recipe will show you how to make caramel, how to temper chocolate and how to mould the chocolates!

Ingredients
  

  • 400 g Dark Chocolate
  • 100 g Caster Sugar
  • 100 g Butter
  • 100 ml Creme Fraiche Double Cream would be fine
  • Salt

Instructions
 

  • Pour the sugar into a pan on medium heat and stir almost consistently to keep it from burning.
  • Once the whole lot has melted, it’s time to add the butter, which will very suddenly cool the sugar and could cause everything to seize up. If this happens, just keep on mixing, ideally with a fairly heavy duty object to begin with, to break up the sugar, then with a whisk, to help reintegrate the components. Move the mixture on and off the heat as you need to to achieve the desired results.
  • Add the Creme Fraiche one teaspoon at a time, stirring vigorously between each spoonful to combine as thoroughly as possible.
  • Add a little salt if you like, to taste. Once you’re done, as long as it’s cool enough, pour the caramel into a squeezy bottle and bring to room temperature. It’s better to store it in the fridge, but it’s difficult to work with that cold.
  • Chop the chocolate as finely as you can. I actually chopped mine, then ran it through a blender and chopped it again.
  • You can use a bain marie at this stage, but I prefer a pan on a very low heat. This stage of the process isn’t quite as sensitive as you’d think, so as long as you’re cautious, it should be fine. Pour in three quarters of the chocolate and melt it down, stirring consistently until it reaches 55c.
  • Take the pan off the heat and gradually add the remaining chocolate to the mix, stirring it in to cool the whole mixture. You want to keep doing this until the chocolate cools to 31c.
  • Spread the chocolate over the mould, filling each compartment. Tap the mould down against the worktop to knock out any air bubbles. Quickly scrape any excess into a large bowl and flip the mould upside down, pouring any excess into the bowl. You may need to be quite heavy handed at this stage. Once as much as possible has drained from the mould, you’ll want to again scrape the top of the mould into the bowl.
  • The chocolate will cool very quickly at this stage, but if you need to, quickly pop it in the fridge. Once it’s set, pipe caramel in, leaving a suitable gap at the top for the base. Generally speaking, it’s helpful to leave a little more space than you’d expect. Once again, get it back into the fridge to cool.
  • Once the caramel is cool, re-temper the chocolate in the bowl as outlined above and spoon/pipe it over the top of each individual chocolate, smoothing as you go.
  • Allow the chocolates to cool in the fridge and once they’re set, tap them from the moulds, trim up the sides if necessary and they’re ready!

If you’ve enjoyed this recipe or have any comments or queries, please do let us know in the comments section below! And don’t forget to like and share!

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